Lincoln Peirce is a cartoonist/writer and the creator of the comic strip Big Nate. It appears in more than two hundred U.S. newspapers and online daily at comics.com.

Lincoln Peirce lives with his wife and two children in Portland, Maine.

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Character Development

I received a very good question about the comic strip in a letter from a reader the other day.  Emily from Illinois wanted to know:  When you invent a new character, how do you decide whether to keep them or throw them out?  I'll begin my answer by talking about the different kinds of characters in a comic strip.  The way I see it, there are five types:

TYPE A:  These characters are the stars of the strip and appear on a regular basis.  Nate is the strip's #1 star, of course; he's in it nearly every single day.  But you don't necessarily have to make daily appearances to be a Type A character.  You just have to be a major part of the proceedings.  Francis and Teddy are good examples of Type A characters.

TYPE B:  These are the supporting players.  They're not in the strip nearly as often as Type A characters, but they appear on a frequent basis.  There are many Type B characters in "Big Nate":  Dad, Gina, Mrs. Godfrey, Chad, Artur, Principal Nichols, and so on.  You don't see them every day, but you know they're there.

TYPE C:  To use a TV phrase, Type C characters are the "special guest stars."  They can be very colorful characters, so their appearances are often memorable.  They might be the focus of an entire week's worth of strips, then disappear for six or eight months.  Some good examples of Type C characters in the comic strip are Spitsy, School Picture Guy, Coach John, Mrs. Czerwicki (the detention monitor) and Peter, the first-grade genius who's Nate's "book buddy."

TYPE D:  These characters are one-offs.  In other words, they are introduced for one specific storyline, and they go away once that storyline is over.  Substitute teachers make good Type D characters.  So do girls that Nate becomes smitten with, like Lila, a young lady who briefly was the star pitcher for Nate's baseball team last summer.

TYPE E:  The unfortunate souls who are part of this group would be called "extras," I guess.  They usually don't have names and are included in the strip to provide some visual interest in the background, or because the gag requires that Nate interacts with a person he doesn't know well, like a cashier at a store.

So, getting back to Emily's question:  when I bring a new character into the strip, how do I know if he or she will be a character who sticks around -- a Type B or a Type C, let's say -- or a Type D or E who isn't likely to last very long?  Well, Emily, the answer is that when I invent a new character, I often have no idea what that character's long-range prospects are.  If they're easy to draw and fun to write about, they'll probably be back at some point.  Chad's a great example of a character who started out as a Type E, and very gradually worked his way up the ladder to a Type B.  The more jokes I wrote for Chad, the better I liked him.  And I could tell readers liked him, too.  At the other end of the spectrum was a character named Mr. Corey, who was part of the strip for a week about five or six years ago.  Mr. Corey was based on my friend, the cartoonist Corey Pandolph, and I found him very tough to draw.  I knew from the start that Mr. Corey was a Type D character.  I included him as a tip of the cap to a friend, but I had no interest in making him a recurring character.

Then there's the kind of character who moves DOWN the ladder while characters like Chad are climbing up.  These are characters who I initially thought would play larger parts in the strip -- they might have even been major players for awhile -- but their roles have diminished over time.  Nate's sister Ellen is a good example.  A onetime Type A character, she's now at the very low end of the Type B spectrum.  Jenny, Nate's dream girl, is another character who's not featured as prominently as she used to be.  Nate's still wild about her, of course.  But sometimes, a cartoonist just starts to run out of ideas for certain characters.

And speaking of running out of ideas, that's all I can think of for today.  So long!

Tue, 06/24/2014

World Cup Fever

I write about sports quite frequently in this blog, for the simple reason that I'm a huge sports fan. But since I began writing Big Nate novels a few years ago in addition to my regular comic strip job, I find I have very little time to actually sit and watch sporting events on TV. Occasionally, though, there's a sporting event that's so big, and so compelling, that I try my best to carve out some time to watch. When that event is World Cup soccer, which officially kicked off last week, watching in the quiet and solitude of my living room just doesn't cut it. So I go to the soccer barn.

My friend Peter lives with his family here in Portland, and they share a driveway with the family that lives next door. At the end of that driveway is a barn. Even though Portland is a fairly large city by Maine standards, it still has some leftover trappings of its more rural past. Many houses, even those in the middle of the city, have barns -- a reminder of days when most Portland families owned horses and/or other livestock.) Peter's neighbor is a German gentleman, and as you may know, Germany is a soccer-crazy country. So whenever there is a major soccer competition -- EuroCup, Olympics, and definitely World Cup -- this fellow puts a giant TV in his barn and invites anyone and everyone to come watch soccer. Every single World Cup match, whether it be a high-profile crowd pleaser like USA vs. Ghana on Monday (a scintillating 2-1 USA win) or a more obscure match like Colombia vs. Ivory Coast, is shown live in its entirety at the soccer barn. And there's usually a pretty good crowd.

Watching sports with a large group of people -- some friends and some complete strangers -- is fun. The soccer barn is the next best thing to being at a World Cup match in person. Over the years, I've been at the soccer barn for thrilling moments (like Landon Donovan's stunning last-minute goal in the 2010 World Cup vs. Algeria, a 1-0 US win) and devastating ones (the US women's loss to Japan on penalty kicks in the 2011 Women's World Cup). And no matter what the result, sharing the experience with a bunch of people in a 150 year-old barn is a blast.

Soccer has always been a major part of Big Nate (the comic strip). It's a sport that tons of kids play, so I think they can identify with the adventures of Nate and his teammates. And parents who read the strip might recognize some of the triumphs and tragedies depicted in these soccer strips. Nate's the goalkeeper for P.S. 38, and once referred to himself as the "anchor" of the team -- until Francis pointed out that an anchor is an immobile object that impedes progress.(By the way, that's a pretty good definition of Spain's goalkeeper, who allowed 5 goals against the Netherlands in their match last week.)

I took this picture the other day, about 15 minutes before the US match vs. Ghana began. Sadly, I couldn't stay for the actual game, because that evening happened to coincide with our daughter's lacrosse team dinner. But I'm hoping to see plenty of the remaining matches at the soccer barn. I'll be rooting for the USA, even though they don't have a very realistic chance of winning. Whoever DOES win the World Cup is sure to have many fans at the soccer barn. It's a very international crowd!

Fri, 06/20/2014

Big Nate: The Musical Is Coming To A Town Near You!

Hi, everyone. I'm afraid I have time for only a short blog entry today. I'll shortly be heading out the door to attend the end-of-the-season potluck for our daughter's lacrosse team, and I'm going straight from there to the rink for my hockey game later tonight. So it's going to be a busy evening!

How about a BIG NATE: THE MUSICAL update? It was only a little over a year ago that I traveled to Glen Echo, Maryland, to watch the world premiere of the musical at Adventure Theatre MTC. I was delighted with the show, as you may remember from the blog entry I wrote afterwards. And Adventure Theatre was pleased, too -- so much so that the artistic director, Michael Bobbitt, began exploring the possibility of putting together a touring company. I'm very happy to tell you that a tour of the musical will soon be a reality. Check the local children's theater in your town to see if it's one of the tour stops!

My only misgiving about this tour was due to the fact that the original cast from last year's production will not be reprising their roles (with the exception of Joshua Dick, who plays Francis). Those actors were so great, I was briefly worried that the touring company cast wouldn't be able to measure up. But no worries! A terrific cast is being assembled, and Michael assures me that they'll be second to none. I'll be able to see for myself in the fall. BIG NATE: THE MUSICAL is coming to Portland, Maine in November, thanks to a great organization called Portland Ovations. I'll be there to sign books, answer some questions from the audience, and watch the show. Hope Nate and his friends come through your town, too!

Tue, 06/17/2014

Happy Father's Day!

Happy Father's Day, everyone! It won't be Father's Day until Sunday, of course, but this is my last blog entry before then. Do something special for your dad this weekend!

When I started the comic strip back in 1991, I imagined that Nate's dad would play a very large role. I was planning to make "Big Nate" a "domestic humor" comic strip, in the tradition of others like "For Better Or For Worse" and "Fox Trot."  In short order, though, I realized that the jokes and stories I most enjoyed telling were the ones about Nate's life at school. That obviously meant that Dad's contributions to the strip would be somewhat reduced. But unlike Nate's sister Ellen -- who is almost never in the strip anymore -- Dad has carved out a small but significant space for himself in the comic strip as well as the chapter books. How about a few Dad Fun Facts?

  • Dad is divorced from Nate's mom, who has never appeared in the strip or the books, and hasn't even been mentioned for years and years. But based on a couple of references in the very early days of the comic strip, we get the message that the divorce was definitely not Dad's idea.
     
  • Dad is a food hypocrite. He tries to force healthy, no-fat foods down Nate's throat (witness his lame attempt to substitute Cheezy Weezies for Nate's beloved Cheez Doodles), but he himself is a junk food junkie.  Remember the song "Junk Food Junkie" by Larry Groce? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQnIL-XPerQ
     
  • Continuing on the food theme: Dad embarrasses Nate every year by insisting on handing out healthy snacks to trick-or-treaters on Halloween. Some of the stuff he's handed out over the years: rice cakes, dried apricots, zesty ranch soy nuts, and bouillon cubes.
     
  • Sports are another area where Dad causes Nate significant embarrassment. He sometimes tries to join Nate and his friends in their games of basketball or football, but it's clear from the results that athletics are not Dad's strength. He also tries to provide some baseball coaching for Nate, but even a simple game of catch seems beyond him. He's just not very good.
     
  • And speaking of sports, Dad enjoys golf, but is terrible at the game. He drags Nate along to caddy for him whenever he plays.
     
  • In the comic strip (but not the books), Dad's family of origin adds some color to the proceedings. Dad's parents are called Marge and Vern (Nate calls them Gram & Gramps), and his unemployed younger brother is Nate's Uncle Ted. (Note: Uncle Ted will be paying Nate a visit this summer. Keep an eye on the comic strip!)
     
  • Dad's first name is Martin. In real life, that was my uncle's name.
     
  • On a couple of occasions, Dad has mortified Nate by flirting with sales ladies during back-to-school shopping excursions.

I'm not sure what my kids have in store for me on Sunday, but I'll act appropriately surprised. And I'll be driving down to New Hampshire later in the day to take my 84 year-old father (and my 82 year-old mom) to lunch. Enjoy your day, dads!

Fri, 06/13/2014

Big Nate Super Fan Sweepstakes!

When you go to www.bignatebooks.com, there's an invitation on the homepage. ENTER THE BIG NATE SUPER FAN SWEEPSTAKES, it says. ENTER FOR A CHANCE TO APPEAR AS A DRAWN CHARACTER IN THE NEXT BIG NATE NOVEL BY AUTHOR LINCOLN PEIRCE. What does this mean, exactly? Well, I'll be happy to tell you as much as I know.

You'll notice that the phrase "drawn character" is used. If you're the sweepstakes winner, that means that I'll create a character that's a "cartoon version" of you, and that character will appear in the next book, Big Nate Lives It Up. This will not be one of the major characters in the novel (remember, the story's already written), but neither will it be a tiny person the size of a pushpin buried in a crowd scene reminiscent of "Where's Waldo." My goal is to create a recognizable character who is clearly identified by name, and who appears in the book more than once.

So how will this happen? You have to enter first, of course! It's very easy -- all you have to do is provide your name and email address. We'll be accepting entries until August 31st, so you've got all summer to get around to it. Next, a grand prize winner will be selected at random. If you're that lucky person, you'll be asked to send a photo of yourself as an electronic file to the Big Nate publisher, Harper Collins. They'll see that I get that photo, and I'll use it to create a cartoon version of YOU. So make sure it's a good picture -- no blurry shots that look like they were taken out the window of a moving race car. I can't promise that it will look exactly like you -- I'm not a caricaturist, after all -- but I think I can come up with something you'll like. And even if your character doesn't have a "speaking part," I'll make sure your name appears in the drawings somehow. Maybe your name is on the back of your sports jersey, or maybe it's on your backpack or notebook. I'll be creative.

And in addition to the grand prize, there will be ten runner-up winners. Each of these ten entrants will receive a complete set of all the Big Nate novels to date. If the kids I meet at schools and bookstores are any indication, many of you have read your Big Nate books until they're almost falling apart. Here's your chance to replace those well-loved copies with some brand-new editions.

I have no idea how many kids will enter, so I can't tell you what your chances of winning are. But remember that Nate was up against an entire town full of Timber Scouts in Big Nate On A Roll, and he still figured out how to win the grand prize (a fancy new skateboard). So there's always hope!

Tue, 06/10/2014

Big Nate Super Fan Sweepstakes!

When you go to www.bignatebooks.com, there's an invitation on the homepage. ENTER THE BIG NATE SUPER FAN SWEEPSTAKES, it says. ENTER FOR A CHANCE TO APPEAR AS A DRAWN CHARACTER IN THE NEXT BIG NATE NOVEL BY AUTHOR LINCOLN PEIRCE. What does this mean, exactly? Well, I'll be happy to tell you as much as I know.

You'll notice that the phrase "drawn character" is used. If you're the sweepstakes winner, that means that I'll create a character that's a "cartoon version" of you, and that character will appear in the next book, Big Nate Lives It Up. This will not be one of the major characters in the novel (remember, the story's already written), but neither will it be a tiny person the size of a pushpin buried in a crowd scene reminiscent of "Where's Waldo." My goal is to create a recognizable character who is clearly identified by name, and who appears in the book more than once.

So how will this happen? You have to enter first, of course! It's very easy -- all you have to do is provide your name and email address. We'll be accepting entries until August 31st, so you've got all summer to get around to it. Next, a grand prize winner will be selected at random. If you're that lucky person, you'll be asked to send a photo of yourself as an electronic file to the Big Nate publisher, Harper Collins. They'll see that I get that photo, and I'll use it to create a cartoon version of YOU. So make sure it's a good picture -- no blurry shots that look like they were taken out the window of a moving race car. I can't promise that it will look exactly like you -- I'm not a caricaturist, after all -- but I think I can come up with something you'll like. And even if your character doesn't have a "speaking part," I'll make sure your name appears in the drawings somehow. Maybe your name is on the back of your sports jersey, or maybe it's on your backpack or notebook. I'll be creative.

And in addition to the grand prize, there will be ten runner-up winners. Each of these ten entrants will receive a complete set of all the Big Nate novels to date. If the kids I meet at schools and bookstores are any indication, many of you have read your Big Nate books until they're almost falling apart. Here's your chance to replace those well-loved copies with some brand-new editions.

I have no idea how many kids will enter, so I can't tell you what your chances of winning are. But remember that Nate was up against an entire town full of Timber Scouts in Big Nate On A Roll, and he still figured out how to win the grand prize (a fancy new skateboard). So there's always hope!

Tue, 06/10/2014

Teachers in the Summer

With summer vacation just around the corner (or already here, for some of you), this strip from 2010 provides a good topic for a blog entry. Nate is dismayed to learn that School Picture Guy has resorted to dressing in a lobster costume as a summer job. The irony, of course, is that the person Nate has chosen to speak to about this fact is none other than his art teacher, Mr. Rosa, who's working the counter at "Sweet Licks." For several years now, I've written gags about Mr. Rosa working in an ice cream parlor during summer vacation, and the humiliations, both large and small, this causes him. He must deal with obnoxious current and former students, of course. His boss is a kid who's probably about one-third his age. And then there's the fact that he has to wear a pink apron and visor. All this, and they're probably only paying him minimum wage.

Kids Nate's age are old enough to understand that their teachers have lives outside of school -- as opposed to very young children who often think that their teachers LIVE in their classrooms. But just because Nate understands that Mr. Rosa doesn't sleep on a cot in the art studio at P.S. 38 doesn't mean he really gets why his art teacher is filling a sugar cone with two scoops of Rocky Road. He's connected the dots that School Picture Guy must hold down a variety of jobs to make ends meet, but doesn't seem clued in to the fact that Mr. Rosa is in the same boat. Certainly, when I was a sixth grader like Nate, it never would have occurred to me that some of my teachers HAD to work summer jobs just to make a living. As a former schoolteacher myself, I can attest to the fact that it's not a particularly high-paying profession.

A lot of kids, especially during those middle school years, feel awkward when they run into a teacher out there in the real world. I remember wandering around town as an 11 year-old and seeing one of my teachers walking his dog. It was shocking for two reasons. First, he wasn't wearing his "school uniform" of a jacket and tie with slacks and dress shoes. Instead, he was wearing shorts, a tee shirt, and tennis sneakers. I almost didn't recognize him. Second, and equally surprising to me at the time, was that this man had a DOG. He was not a warm person, and I simply couldn't imagine him being NICE enough to have a dog, if you know what I mean. He didn't strike me as the type who'd enjoy giving belly rubs or playing fetch with Fido.

Here's another teacher & dog story: One day when I was in sixth grade, I was riding my bike (a red Schwinn Stingray) near my house, and saw my sixth-grade English teacher, Mrs. Schultz, walking her German Shepard. (The dog was not on a leash. There were no leash laws 40 years ago.) The dog saw me, bolted across the street, knocked me off my bike, and started biting my leg. Mrs. Schultz managed to get the dog off me, then just walked away. She never stopped to ask if I'd been hurt, or to apologize for her dog. (At that point, I officially designated her my LFT -- Least Favorite Teacher.)

Quick trivia question: In addition to dressing up as a lobster, what are some other jobs School Picture Guy has done?

Answer: He has been a deejay at school dances, a clown at the 4th of July Fair, and a mall Santa, to name three.

That's all for now. See you next week!

Fri, 06/06/2014

Book Expo America 2014

Hi, everyone. I returned to Maine on Sunday after spending a couple of days at Book Expo America 2014 in New York City. As you can see from the picture shown here, it's quite a massive event. I was there to sign copies of Big Nate: In The Zone, the most recent chapter book, and Great Minds Think Alike, the most recent compilation. Unfortunately, almost as soon as I arrived home, I came down with a nasty case of the flu, so I'm afraid I'll have to make this entry pretty brief.

A few of my favorite people were at BEA this year. Jeff Kinney, author of the Wimpy Kid books, gave a talk on Friday morning. Sadly, I didn't have the chance to cross paths with Jeff this time around. But he and I will be seeing each other in September when we reprise our Drawn Together fundraiser. Last year we raised money for the tornado victims in Oklahoma. This year, we'll be trying to lend a hand to folks affected by flooding in Colorado.

Happily, I WAS able to spend some time with a couple of other friends who attended BEA this year: my fellow cartoonists and authors Stephan Pastis and Mark Tatulli. Stephan is the creator of one of the world's most successful comic strips, Pearls Before Swine, and he's also recently entered the children's book realm with his Timmy Failure series. Mark does not one but TWO comics strips -- the award-winning Lio and Heart Of The City -- and he also is now writing books for kids. His first, Desmond Puckett Makes Monster Magic, came out last year, and the second one will go on sale soon. Cartooning is a largely solitary profession, so it's always nice to see some of my colleagues when I have the chance. (Unfortunately, another cartoonist I deeply admire, Patrick McDonnell, had to cancel his appearance at BEA at the last minute. But Patrick sometimes visits Maine during the summer, so perhaps I'll see him during the next couple months.)

A couple of the items on my agenda this week: I'm working on the drawings for the back cover of book #7, Big Nate Lives It Up. I'll also be making a few minor changes to the final three chapters of the book. And then I'll start in on the finished art for the interior. I haven't counted how many drawings there are, but it'll be something like 400. And, of course, I have to keep on top of my comic strip deadlines. So I'll have my work cut out for me!

Tue, 06/03/2014

Quotes

I was going to write a short blog entry about BEA -- Book Expo America, where I'll be on Friday and Saturday at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City -- until I conducted another one of those fascinating Google Image searches. I was looking for pictures of myself with other authors and/or cartoonists at past Book Expos...and then I found this quote. Not exactly the sort of thing you'd select to put in your school yearbook, is it? My "senior quote" in the yearbook when I graduated from high school was by Oscar Wilde: "What is a cynic? A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing." I'm not sure why I chose that particular quote at the particular time in my life, but it sure beats a quote about a boy picking his nose.

But yes, it's true: I DID write these words -- in the comic strip, several years ago. Nate, as you may know, has a somewhat complicated relationship with the character known as "School Picture Guy." Sometimes Nate loathes him for taking horribly ugly and awkward pictures of Nate every year on School Picture Day. Sometimes he's exasperated by School Picture Guy's overwhelming nerdiness. But other times, Nate actually seems to like and admire School Picture Guy, even seeking him out for advice on occasion. That's what happened in this particular story line. Nate is being instructed by SPG in the fine art of candid photography. The two of them have been hiding behind a bookcase for quite some time, cameras focused on one of Nate's classmates. Nate wonders what they're waiting for, and why it's taking so long. SPG responds with the words you see here: "Give a boy -- ANY boy -- enough time, and he WILL eventually pick his nose." How poetic.

So it's really School Picture Guy's quote, not mine. But I stand by it. It's 100% true.

BIG NATE LIVES IT UP update: I've finished the writing part of this book (although it's safe to say there will still be some text tweaked here and there), so that's pretty exciting. Once I get back from BEA, I'll be jumping into the drawings. I'm behind where I was a year ago when I was working on BIG NATE IN THE ZONE, so I'll need to have a productive summer. And remember, you have a chance to appear as a character in this book! Enter the BIG NATE SUPER FAN SWEEPSTAKES! Check it out right here on this website! That's all for now. I'll be seeing some interesting people at BEA, and I'll tell you more about them in my next entry!

Thu, 05/29/2014

All-Time Great Villains

Hi, everyone. I hope those of you who observed Memorial Day enjoyed the long weekend. When I was a kid, Memorial Day always meant two things. The first was the Memorial Day Fair, held each year on the school playground in my hometown of Durham, New Hampshire. The second was the thrilling realization that the end of the school year was less than a month away.

As I sometimes do, I watched a movie on my laptop this weekend while I was drawing. The movie: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Khan, shown here, was played by the late, great Ricardo Montalban, reprising a role he had originated in the Star Trek TV series some 15 years earlier. Is the movie cheesy? Yes. Are the special effects lame? Indeed. Does William Shatner's toupee look like a dead squirrel taped to his head? Absolutely. But Khan rocks this movie. He's a great villain.

That got me thinking about villains in general. As I think I've written before, during my first 18 years or so of doing the comic strip, villains -- or bullies, if you want to call them that -- didn't play much of a role. Nate would occasionally run afoul of Chester, the sasquatch-like but always unseen goon with anger management issues; or he'd encounter some obnoxious kid from an opposing basketball team. But there wasn't really a classic bully character. I didn't need one. But that changed when I started writing the chapter books. The longer stories demanded more conflict -- because who wants to read stories where everything's a-ok 100% of the time? -- and Chester, Mrs. Godfrey, and even Gina didn't provide enough negative mojo. So I created Randy Betancourt toward the end of book 2, and he played a major role in book 3. Then, because I didn't want to keep repeating myself in subsequent books, I created other villains: Nolan, the kid from Jefferson Middle School in book 4; Nick Blonsky, the duplicitous hall monitor in book 5; and Marcus, the bully-disguised-as-a-cool-kid in book 6. These characters aren't at all likable, but I DO like them from a writing standpoint. A good villain can make or break a book -- or a movie, play, or TV show, for that matter.

So who are some of the all-time great villains? I'll confine my choices to stories that readers of BIG NATE might have seen. In other words, no adult books, movies, etc.

 

  • Lord Voldemort: You can't get much more evil than this guy. He killed Harry Potter's parents, then spends seven books trying to off poor Harry -- and he doesn't care who gets in the way of his Dark Arts magic in the process.
  • Darth Vader: I'm not a huge Star Wars fan, but even I have to admit that the mask, the helmet, and the James Earl Jones voice make DV a pretty memorable villain.
  • The Evil Queen from "Snow White & The Seven Dwarfs." How could she be so mean to that nice Snow White?
  • Templeton from "Charlotte's Web." As I've written before, Templeton is one of the most fascinating characters in the history of children's literature. He is completely loathsome, selfish, and greedy; yet his actions help save Wilbur's life.
  • The Joker: Whether it's in the comic books, on the TV show, or on the big screen, the Joker is -- by FAR -- the best villain in the entire Batman franchise
  • Gollum from "The Hobbit" and "The Lord Of The Rings." You felt bad for Gollum, because it wasn't his fault he was corrupted and warped by the Ring. But did he have to act so creepy all the time?
  • The Wicked Witch of the West from "The Wizard of Oz." Okay, I know kids are more sophisticated now, and they might not be freaked out a a green skinned witch who hangs out with flying monkeys. But the first time I saw the movie, I was terrified.
  • Cruela de Vil: She wants to kill puppies. Need I say more?
  • The Grand High Witch from Roald Dahl's "The Witches." She has claws, a worm-eaten face, and is bald. Try reading THAT as an 8 year-old and then getting a good night's sleep.
  • Mister Burns from "The Simpsons." He's a comedic villain instead of a truly threatening one, but can we really hold that against him?

 

This isn't a complete list, of course. It would take forever to count up and rank all the villains out there. Some others that come to mind are: Boris and Natasha, The White Witch (from "The Chronicles Of Narnia"), Scar (from "The Lion King"), Doctor Octopus (from "Spiderman"), the Dragon Lady (from "Terry & The Pirates"), Bluto (from "Popeye")...I could go on and on. But I won't. That's enough for today!

 

Tue, 05/27/2014